Merema, the folk band that’s trying to keep the Mordova culture alive

Let’s start the new week start with a song that takes us somewhere in the world: I came across this fascinating article about songs from Russia but not in Russian*, and have decided to make a series out of it.

We continue our journey in Mordovia, in Central Russia, and I’m quoting the article:

The Mordovia region is inhabited by Mordvins, who have their own (disappearing) language. The band Merema (“Legend” in English) travels across the region in search of interesting folk artifacts and ancient national costumes. They also collect old ritual music, such as the wedding song ”Come out, friends.” One of Merema’s goals is to revive the local folk language and traditions.

*in Russian language, the word for Russian (language, ethnicity: русский) is different from the word for Russian (federal country, nationality: российский). That makes better sense than in English!

Have a great week!

This post is part of a weekly event called The Monday Travel song. You can participate, too, by doing the following:

  • Create your own post every Monday and title it The Monday travel song: xxx by xxx
  • Include a link to a song (YouTube link or other)
  • It must be a song which is linked to a geography. For example, a Russian song, a Chinese song, a Scottish song… (it can be from your own country every now and then, but remember the purpose is to get others to virtually travel!)
  • Your post doesn’t have to be long, but do tell us a little bit about the song… for example by telling about the lyrics, about the composer, about the style…
  • Include a link to my own Monday travel song in your post tag it “Monday-travel-song” so others can find it too
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Cheeke, the cool party song from Yakutia

Let’s start the new week start with a song that takes us somewhere in the world: I came across this fascinating article about songs from Russia but not in Russian*, and have decided to make a series out of it.

We’re starting our journey in Yakutia and I’m quoting the article:

In addition to Russian, people in the Siberian region of Yakutia speak the Yakut language. The young singer Ulyana Sergucheva, a.k.a. Kyunney, will make you want to dance with her cheerful song “Cheeke” (“Like, cool” in Yakut). She sings: “Since that moment you’ll be dancing in the Cheeke rhythm. Since that moment your heart will beat in this atmosphere.“ And bit of trivia: After the video came out, the funny guy with green mustache became very popular in Yakutia and even starred in a local movie!

*in Russian language, the word for Russian (language, ethnicity: русский) is different from the word for Russian (federal country, nationality: российский). That makes better sense than in English!

Have a great week!

This post is part of a weekly event called The Monday Travel song. You can participate, too, by doing the following:

  • Create your own post every Monday and title it The Monday travel song: xxx by xxx
  • Include a link to a song (YouTube link or other)
  • It must be a song which is linked to a geography. For example, a Russian song, a Chinese song, a Scottish song… (it can be from your own country every now and then, but remember the purpose is to get others to virtually travel!)
  • Your post doesn’t have to be long, but do tell us a little bit about the song… for example by telling about the lyrics, about the composer, about the style…
  • Include a link to my own Monday travel song in your post tag it “Monday-travel-song” so others can find it too

The Russian butcher who moonlighted as a dentist in a Tatar food market

This week, the WordPress photo challenge theme is Unlikely.

Unlikely, like this snapshot of daily life in the food market of Kazan, in Tatarstan (Russia).

Many of us enjoy visiting and taking pictures of markets, I know, and whilst it can be interesting to make colourful shots, it is far more challenging to create pictures with a narrative.

I’m still not entirely sure what this one’s story is…

24 hours in Chechnya Part II: Islam, patriotism and propaganda

As I told you recently, I have been very impressed by the Chechen hospitality.

And equally impressed by the omnipresence of propaganda, in a way that I found reminiscent of Astana, the city I call Dubai of the steppe, with a pinch of Pyongyang”.

The bromance of the Caucasus that unites Kadyrov and Putin is something you cannot miss when strolling around the streets of Chechen towns. It is the visible part of a strong political effort to create a national sentiment, in the context of the post-war reconstruction of Chechnya.

This national sentiment is very much centred around Islam. It is no coincidence that the first building that the government erected in the then war-destroyed capital Grozny, was a great mosque.

The big and beautiful Akhmad Kadyrov mosque, also known as “Heart of Chechnya”

And it is no coincidence that this great mosque bears the name of the previous leader Akhmad Kadyrov, and was opened during a ceremony that Putin attended.

Me inside Grozny’s mosque

A very impressive and beautiful mosque, now in the middle of a super modern district with skyscrapers, gardens, and a few cafes and restaurants.

The war feels it happened ages ago, and there are no remaining traces of it (unlike in some other parts of Caucasus such as Abkhazia)

All the city centre has been rebuilt with lots of pretty details of Muslim inspiration

And as this great mosque’s prioritisation for the post-war reconstruction manifests, Islam is a serious matter in Chechnya. Almost all men have beards (our host Alik was one of the few who don’t), almost all women wear hejab (albeit sometimes with high heels and make up; but it’s still modest clothing), there is no alcohol available, and the 5 daily prayers are observed by everyone.

All of that sponsored by the government and with the benevolence of the Russian Federation as partner; and with a strong personality cult for Akhmad Kadyrov, because what better way to contain religious fundamentalism than creating a competitive passion for another hero than God?

Besides the mosque, Grozny is full of other monuments dedicated to the glory of the leader Akhmad Kadyrov, like this museum with golden obelisque.

The personality cult is very similar to what’s observable in Astana. Portraits, quotes everywhere, newly built and enormously pompous museums and monuments to his glory.

24 hours for Chechnya was a bit short; next time I’ll stay longer!

Leninglyptophilia aka Lenin-statues-mania: I’ve found my alter ego!

If you read this blog, you certainly know how big a fan I am of Lenin statues. I’ve identified the recurring principles behind Lenin statue design, I’ve played with a giant Lenin head, I’ve reported funny attacks on Lenin statues, and demonstrated how much prestige Lenin loses when covered with snow in winter…

I was very pleased to realize I’m not the only one. First, because it’s always pleasant to meet like-minded people. Second, because I write a blog, so it’s comforting to know there’s an audience for my Lenin statue related silliness.

And finally, because this other fan of Lenin statues has committed to a true public interest task: an inventory of all the past and existing Lenin statues; more comprehensive than a Wikipedia list, and with pictures. A daunting but oh so useful challenge!

https://www.instagram.com/collection_lenin_monuments/

You’ll find their Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/collection_lenin_monuments/

Follow them and you may well see some of my own Lenin statues pictures that they are reposting!

PS I’ve been looking for a word to say “statue-mania”. Greek is often a good source for this sort of word creation, and I looked for the Greek word for ‘statue’ hoping to simply combine it with ‘philia’.

Alas, the perversion of human beings is such that agalmatophilia, literally the liking of statues, is commonly used (apparently) to describe a perverse practice involving sex and a statue, doll or mannequin.

I wanted to make sure you do grasp the irony in my love of Lenin statues, so I resorted to another Greek-based neologism around the idea of statues, glyptos – glyptophilia.

Three men, absorbed in thoughts, around the world

This week, the WordPress photo challenge theme is A Face in the Crowd.

I can totally relate to the author sharing how afraid she is of asking people for portraits, and how she resorted to taking pictures of faceless portraits captured as they are, just one in the crowd.

My dual love of people watching and of photography means that I often enjoy sitting somewhere and catching a glimpse of people as they go about their daily lives, sometimes making visual memories when the setting pleases my eye.

A man repairs a rooftop in Meghri, Armenia

Rather than a face in the crowd though, introvert that I am, I like to isolate people and show them alone in their environment, as if they were not just busy on their activities, but also absorbed in their thoughts.

A man in djellaba walks across Jemaa el Fna square in Marrakesh, Morocco
A fisherman chooses his spot on the frozen sea, in Vladivostok, Russia.

24 hours in Chechnya: Part I, the Chechen hospitality

I have visited Chechnya during a trip in North Caucasus early September 2017. I arrived in Grozny from Vladikavkaz with my travel mate Igor, and left back to the West to Pyatigorsk whilst Igor was pushing further East.

This old map, found in the bus station of Vladikavkaz, shows you where Chechnya is within North Caucasus. Grozny, the capital, is the orange dot below the vertical line.

Why just 24 hours? Serendipity more than strategy. I was on a schedule, keen to keep enough time for my next stop Pyatigorsk, and Igor was keen to reach Dagestan as soon as possible. And possibly, my mum would be happy if I didn’t stay too long.

For Chechnya has acquired quite a reputation in the media through the years. But forget about the media and let me tell you my totally different impression.

Grozny city centre

In Grozny, we were hosted by Alik, friendly and curious father of 2 kids, who turned very instrumental in helping us make the most out of our short time. We found him on Couchsurfing after sending dozens of requests.

Somewhere in a park of Grozny. I don’t know what the bears were all about.

The Chechen hospitality reminded me a lot of Uzbekistan or Iran; we were definitely in that part of the world. Hosts love taking care of guests, and feel in charge of them.

Alik and his friendly Chechen biker friends

Alik fed us, gave us a roof and a bed, a Wifi access, and made sure we were comfortable. He introduced us to his family, drove us around, and told us many things about Grozny, including what happened to his family’s house during the war: it was occupied by Russian soldiers, who during winter burnt the family’s piano to keep warm.

We arrived just two days after Eid al-Adha, and there were a lot of meat leftovers which our host’s brother prepared as shashlyk.
The only weapons we found during our 24 hours in Chechnya were our host’s dad’s, exposed in his personal room.

Alik knows someone who knows someone, and that’s how we managed to access the rooftop of the highest building in Grozny, a 40-storey tall skyscraper with 360 views on the Chechen capital. The side of the rooftop that offers views to the Presidential palace is off limits though: none is allowed to stand there, for it wouldn’t be too hard from there to aim and cause trouble to the dictator-president.

Grozny city centre seen from the roof of the tallest skyscraper

It was very amusing how, on the morning of departure, Alik found me a ride and ‘handed me over’ to a bus driver who then fell in charge of me. When our bus reached Pyatigorsk, the driver (who was further driving to Cherkessk) wished me good luck and to meet in Chechnya again.

In 24 hours in Chechnya I have met nothing but friendly people and a relaxed atmosphere!

Stay tuned for the next part of my impressions of Chechnya: Islam, patriotism and propaganda.