The perfect Monday morning ska song

I propose to start every new week with a song that takes us somewhere in the world.

Today we are travelling back to the Catalunya of the 1990s with a ska song from Discípulos de Otilia performed in English.

I’ve known this song for many, many years, and it is my go-to song when I need a bit of morning power. I’m clearly not a morning person, but today I am facing a massive jetlag and woke up at 4 am.

There’s not much more I know about the band, Discípulos de Otilia. They’re a ska band from the pre-Internet ages, testified by their Myspace account that’s still existing, although the band is not active anymore.

Hopefully this sound can power me through the day today!

Have a great week!

This post is part of a weekly event called The Monday Travel song. You can participate, too, by doing the following:

  • Create your own post every Monday and title it The Monday travel song: xxx by xxx
  • Include a link to a song (YouTube link or other)
  • It must be a song which is linked to a geography. For example, a Russian song, a Chinese song, a Scottish song… (it can be from your own country every now and then, but remember the purpose is to get others to virtually travel!)
  • Your post doesn’t have to be long, but do tell us a little bit about the song… for example by telling about the lyrics, about the composer, about the style…
  • Include a link to my own Monday travel song in your post tag it “Monday-travel-song” so others can find it too
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Inuit Nunaat, the Greenlandic song that reminds the White man he’s not home

It’s been a little while I haven’t started a new week with a song that takes us somewhere in the world!

But during my recent travels in Greenland, I have discovered the band Sume and I’m very keen to share this finding.

Sume was a huge band in Greenland; OK Greenland is a small place with no more inhabitants than would fit in a football stadion, but still, Sume was a huge band there.

In the 1970s, it was a bit the Beatles of Greenland, but with a political tint. The first rock band formed there, it created a musical revolution in a country that did not really have a musical culture – or culture at all – other than the ancestral one of the Inuit people.

It was such revolution that a film was released recently, called The Sound of a Revolution, that takes us back to those times when a national sentiment emerged in Greenland, and the role the band played in society.

Today Greenland is largely autonomous, but still part of Denmark, and whether the country should try and go independent or not is a constant debate in the Greenlandic society.

I’ve selected this particular song from Sume because I’ve heard it a lot there, indicating that it’s a very famous one, and because of its lyrics, found in original Greenlandic language and translated here. Have a look:

We came here in ancient times (reference to the native Inuits who came from Canada and settled a very long time ago) 
To these lands where we now roam
Utilizing their resources, getting power from them,
It is for future generations
What our ancestor’s upheld
It is the land of the Inuit
It will be theirs, it will be theirs forever

Then came the quallunaat – the white people – with their way of life
They called themselves holy
And wanted to influence us
Their masters decreed they should rule our lands
And take possession of their resources

Have a travel-inspired week!

This post is part of a weekly event called The Monday Travel song. You can participate, too, by doing the following:

  • Create your own post every Monday and title it The Monday travel song: xxx by xxx
  • Include a link to a song (YouTube link or other)
  • It must be a song which is linked to a geography. For example, a Russian song, a Chinese song, a Scottish song… (it can be from your own country every now and then, but remember the purpose is to get others to virtually travel!)
  • Your post doesn’t have to be long, but do tell us a little bit about the song… for example by telling about the lyrics, about the composer, about the style…
  • Include a link to my own Monday travel song in your post tag it “Monday-travel-song” so others can find it too

Arschloch, the German antifascist punk song

I propose to start every new week with a song that takes us somewhere in the world.

Today I’m taking you to Germany back in the nineties with Arschloch (means Asshole), the song of Berlin-based punk band Die Aerzte (means The Doctors).

Arschloch is meant as an insult to idiotic fascists, whose obscurantism and lack of affection leads to hatred and radical opinions. It was released in 1993 but has never sounded so topical to me.

An overview of the lyrics:

Deine Gewalt ist nur ein stummer Schrei nach Liebe
Deine Springerstiefel sehnen sich nach Zärtlichkeit
Du hast nie gelernt dich zu artikulieren
Und deine Eltern hatten niemals für dich Zeit – oh oh oh Arschloch!

Weil du Probleme hast die kleinen interessieren
Weil du Schiss vorm Schmusen hast bist du ein Fascist
Du musst deinen Selbsthass nich auf andere projezieren
Damit keiner merkt was für ein lieber Kerl du bist – oh oh oh Arschloch!

Translation:

Your violence is only a silent cry for love
Your army boots long for tenderness
You have never learnt to express yourself
And your parents had never time for you – oh oh oh asshole!

Because you have problems that none is interested in
Because you’re scared of cuddles you’re a fascist
You don’t have to project your self-hatred on to others
So none notices what a lovely guy you are – oh oh oh asshole!

I was just 12 years old when Arschloch became a bit hit and I remember really well the mixed feelings of excitement for the song and awareness that its title made it quite transgressive for kids our age. I’ve had a bit of nostalgia for Germany recently so hearing it at a party a few days ago was quite a sweet sensation.

Have a great week!

This post is part of a weekly event called The Monday Travel song. You can participate, too, by doing the following:

  • Create your own post every Monday and title it The Monday travel song: xxx by xxx
  • Include a link to a song (YouTube link or other)
  • It must be a song which is linked to a geography. For example, a Russian song, a Chinese song, a Scottish song… (it can be from your own country every now and then, but remember the purpose is to get others to virtually travel!)
  • Your post doesn’t have to be long, but do tell us a little bit about the song… for example by telling about the lyrics, about the composer, about the style…
  • Include a link to my own Monday travel song in your post tag it “Monday-travel-song” so others can find it too

Patelins lorrains: the rap song with all the worse Lorraine village names

I propose to start every new week with a song that takes us somewhere in the world.

 

There are many villages with funny names in Lorraine, a region in the North-East of France close to the German and Luxemburg borders. Many sound funny in French because of their Germanic root, but most simply sound funny because rural villages names do sound funny, no matter where!

I’ve always had a thing for funny topographic names; for example I’ve always been dreaming to visit cities named Ouagadougou, Dnepropetrovsk, Addis-Abbeba, or Antananarivo.

So I could not ignore this tribute to funny Lorraine names that makes me very eager to travel to and see this places with my own eyes… and sample the local schnapps!

Have a great week!

This post is part of a weekly event called The Monday Travel song. You can participate, too, by doing the following:

  • Create your own post every Monday and title it The Monday travel song: xxx by xxx
  • Include a link to a song (YouTube link or other)
  • It must be a song which is linked to a geography. For example, a Russian song, a Chinese song, a Scottish song… (it can be from your own country every now and then, but remember the purpose is to get others to virtually travel!)
  • Your post doesn’t have to be long, but do tell us a little bit about the song… for example by telling about the lyrics, about the composer, about the style…
  • Include a link to my own Monday travel song in your post tag it “Monday-travel-song” so others can find it too

Festnoz chez Nolwenn: the party song with all the clichés about Brittany

I propose to start every new week with a song that takes us somewhere in the world.

This is a complete collection of clichés about Brittany: from the traditional costume to the savoury pancakes, via the sailor shirt and the use of phrases from traditional songs, as well as the landmarks such as the beautiful coast and the Forest of Brocéliande, none of the stereotypes are missing.

In the videoclip, a couple of Asian tourists gets trapped in the middle of it all and obviously enjoy it a lot, for Brittany is very endearing and, as the song says: “In Brittany we know how to party!”.

I discovered this song at the occasion of a week spent in immersion in Brittany last week. Obviously some locals have attacked the artist for using only clichés about their region, but he claims his aim was just to talk about Brittany in a fun way. Make up your mind and watch it for youself!

Have a great week!

This post is part of a weekly event called The Monday Travel song. You can participate, too, by doing the following:

  • Create your own post every Monday and title it The Monday travel song: xxx by xxx
  • Include a link to a song (YouTube link or other)
  • It must be a song which is linked to a geography. For example, a Russian song, a Chinese song, a Scottish song… (it can be from your own country every now and then, but remember the purpose is to get others to virtually travel!)
  • Your post doesn’t have to be long, but do tell us a little bit about the song… for example by telling about the lyrics, about the composer, about the style…
  • Include a link to my own Monday travel song in your post tag it “Monday-travel-song” so others can find it too

A jazzy Monday morning, Savoy-style

I propose to start every new week with a song that takes us somewhere in the world.

I opted for a mood lifter today! Music that makes me happy and makes me want to dance. What else then to share than this classic jazz track played by Benny Goodman and Chick Webb at the legendary Savoy club of New York in 1934.

I am an enthusiastic lindy hop dancer, and have danced a million times on Stompin’ at the Savoy – and hope for many more to come.

Have a great week!

This post is part of a weekly event called The Monday Travel song. You can participate, too, by doing the following:

  • Create your own post every Monday and title it The Monday travel song: xxx by xxx
  • Include a link to a song (YouTube link or other)
  • It must be a song which is linked to a geography. For example, a Russian song, a Chinese song, a Scottish song… (it can be from your own country every now and then, but remember the purpose is to get others to virtually travel!)
  • Your post doesn’t have to be long, but do tell us a little bit about the song… for example by telling about the lyrics, about the composer, about the style…
  • Include a link to my own Monday travel song in your post tag it “Monday-travel-song” so others can find it too

Nastya: the rock from the Urals

I propose to start every new week with a song that takes us somewhere in the world.

This weekend I was in Kaliningrad, Russia, and attended festival Kin Rock where I discovered Nastya, a rock band from St Petersburg and original from Sverdlosk.

Have a great week!

This post is part of a weekly event called The Monday Travel song. You can participate, too, by doing the following:

  • Create your own post every Monday and title it The Monday travel song: xxx by xxx
  • Include a link to a song (YouTube link or other)
  • It must be a song which is linked to a geography. For example, a Russian song, a Chinese song, a Scottish song… (it can be from your own country every now and then, but remember the purpose is to get others to virtually travel!)
  • Your post doesn’t have to be long, but do tell us a little bit about the song… for example by telling about the lyrics, about the composer, about the style…
  • Include a link to my own Monday travel song in your post tag it “Monday-travel-song” so others can find it too