24 hours in Chechnya: Part I, the Chechen hospitality

I have visited Chechnya during a trip in North Caucasus early September 2017. I arrived in Grozny from Vladikavkaz with my travel mate Igor, and left back to the West to Pyatigorsk whilst Igor was pushing further East.

This old map, found in the bus station of Vladikavkaz, shows you where Chechnya is within North Caucasus. Grozny, the capital, is the orange dot below the vertical line.

Why just 24 hours? Serendipity more than strategy. I was on a schedule, keen to keep enough time for my next stop Pyatigorsk, and Igor was keen to reach Dagestan as soon as possible. And possibly, my mum would be happy if I didn’t stay too long.

For Chechnya has acquired quite a reputation in the media through the years. But forget about the media and let me tell you my totally different impression.

Grozny city centre

In Grozny, we were hosted by Alik, friendly and curious father of 2 kids, who turned very instrumental in helping us make the most out of our short time. We found him on Couchsurfing after sending dozens of requests.

Somewhere in a park of Grozny. I don’t know what the bears were all about.

The Chechen hospitality reminded me a lot of Uzbekistan or Iran; we were definitely in that part of the world. Hosts love taking care of guests, and feel in charge of them.

Alik and his friendly Chechen biker friends

Alik fed us, gave us a roof and a bed, a Wifi access, and made sure we were comfortable. He introduced us to his family, drove us around, and told us many things about Grozny, including what happened to his family’s house during the war: it was occupied by Russian soldiers, who during winter burnt the family’s piano to keep warm.

We arrived just two days after Eid al-Adha, and there were a lot of meat leftovers which our host’s brother prepared as shashlyk.
The only weapons we found during our 24 hours in Chechnya were our host’s dad’s, exposed in his personal room.

Alik knows someone who knows someone, and that’s how we managed to access the rooftop of the highest building in Grozny, a 40-storey tall skyscraper with 360 views on the Chechen capital. The side of the rooftop that offers views to the Presidential palace is off limits though: none is allowed to stand there, for it wouldn’t be too hard from there to aim and cause trouble to the dictator-president.

Grozny city centre seen from the roof of the tallest skyscraper

It was very amusing how, on the morning of departure, Alik found me a ride and ‘handed me over’ to a bus driver who then fell in charge of me. When our bus reached Pyatigorsk, the driver (who was further driving to Cherkessk) wished me good luck and to meet in Chechnya again.

In 24 hours in Chechnya I have met nothing but friendly people and a relaxed atmosphere!

Stay tuned for the next part of my impressions of Chechnya: Islam, patriotism and propaganda.

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