Moscow’s exciting transformation! Part I: What is changing, and why it’s great

Moscow is undergoing a major transformation, partly under the impulse of the current mayor Sobyanin. If you’ve been in Moscow in the past 15 years and hated it, maybe it’s time to reconsider and visit the new Moscow.

It is becoming so great that it fills me with joy just to think about it.

Gorki Park has everything a family needs to spend a great day, and indeed in summer it feels like all Moscow is here.

Sure, in a sense, a lot of what is new about Moscow is quite normal: there is space for pedestrians to walk, the bus stops have information about bus lines, important navigation signs are written in English.

Yes, in a sense, Moscow is just catching up and becoming a normal city that’s nice to be in. Under the mayor’s motto to make the city “for the people”, Moscow is becoming more livable.

During the transformation, many buildings being renovated were bearing a painted cover, making the city still relatively pleasant despite the heavy works everywhere.

From a hostile, crazy urban environment developed too fast in a new capitalistic world where the rights belong to the rich, Moscow is slowly transforming into a pleasant, welcoming urban space with more opportunity for respect and equality.

The horrible and dirty kiosks that had invaded the public spaces when capitalism boomed, arguably made it very easy to find somewhere to repair your shoes or eat a quick snack, but left no space to walk for people; they have all been removed.

The disgusting asphalt of the streets, full of potholes and covered with stains, have been replaced by new, clean one, and sometimes even stone or other prettier materials.

The whole area around Tretyakovskaya has been fully renovated with many pleasant, green places for pedestrians.

The authorities are encouraging Moscow people to drive less and walk more. People now have to pay for parking (yes only that’s very recent), and the city has reduced the width of big avenues to create more space for the pedestrians.

Tverskaya, at the very heart of Moscow, also underwent recent transformation: less space for cars, more for pedestrians and cyclists.

The bus stops now have information about bus lines and times, which makes it easier for anyone to use public transportation.

A clean bus stop with (digital) information like this may look absolutely normal, but it was unimaginable 5 years ago. This transformation has made Moscow so much more easy and pleasant to navigate.

The parks have been renovated, including a sparkly new one that just opened close to Red Square, and include imaginative new features such as the super cool obstacle ride of the Crimea Embankment (Krymskaya Naberezhnaya) that’s so much fun on a hot summer evening. And you can now rent city bikes like in every other big city in the world.

Squares have been renovated too, with more space to hang out and enjoy life, like on the big swings on Triumfalnaya Square.

Triumfalnaya Square has been completely transformed and is now a very green and pleasant square

And all of that great transformation culminates with a smoking ban finally in place everywhere, ultimate sign of modernity.

There are street photo exhibitions very regularly, reminding Muscovites of the beauty of Russia, making Moscow not just a huge megalopolis but a true capital to an attractive country, and adding to the pleasure one has to walk around its embellished streets.

One of the many street photo exhibitions, here in front of Kazansky Vokzal (railway station), that show the beauty of Russia.

Moscow is crowded, and remains crowded, but at least the people now have somewhere to go and enjoy life, even for free.

This all went actually quite fast, with the mayor instilling a tempo to ensure the city would be ready for its 870th anniversary celebrations in September 2017.

Moscow’s 870th birthday celebrations in September 2017 were the deadline mayor Sobyanin had set for Moscow’s transformation

There’s some criticism of course, and in particular about when and where this transformation will stop. The authorities’ have decided to next tackle housing, and destroy up to 70% of the so-called Brejnevka building – pre-fabricated apartment blocks from Brejnev’s time. Not all agree, and quite a few wonder if the mayor is doing this just to give contracts to his friends, a very common practice in Russia; and many fear that this will only increase rents, already very high in Moscow.

The metro is still the metro, but you can now pay your tickets by credit card (when it works), and there are even designated areas for musicians!

But at least, Moscow has caught up with other megalopoles and is becoming pleasant. So pleasant, that when I look back to how things were 5 years ago, I am starting to wonder: what exactly did I like about it?

I had breakfast on this sunny terrace in September 2017 and it took me a while to recognise this as what I’d known as urban wasteland since 2010. By the wasteland was a cut-throat alley that led to the entrance of my favourite Moscow club, Krisis Zhanra. The club has gone alas, replaced by this restaurant, but so happy to see the square now renovated and very pleasant to hang out on.

(Second part tomorrow)

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