What it’s like to live in the most isolated town of remote Russia

48 hours stranded in a hole, somewhere in the middle of a Soviet nowhere – this happened to me last summer when bad weather conditions caused my flight out of the remoteness to be severely delayed.

I was in Ust-Nera, in the Russian permafrost, ending a visit of the most remote, isolated and abandoned areas of Soviet Russia.

Try googling Ust-Nera. You will probably have to zoom out a few times before you can relate to anything familiar on the map.

There is very little to do in Ust-Nera; the place is totally desolated, it was raining, and you had to wait until 2 pm to buy booze – an old Gorbachev-time law that has long disappeared in Russia, but the decree of cancellation may not have reached this part of the world.

So until I could intoxicate myself to make the reality shinier, I used my mornings to walk around and figure out: what can it be like to live in such a hole of the Russian permafrost?

Imagine that you live in Ust-Nera, a previous base for the gulag labour camps, 9.000 km East of Moscow, with 6.000 other inhabitants.

There are 8 to 10 months of winter, when it typically gets as low as minus 50.

When the summer is finally there, mosquitoes proliferate and bite you mercilessly.

Summers are also humid, and because it’s permafrost, the rain stays on the surface instead of being absorbed by the earth. Hence the whole place is a swamp, and a paradise for mosquitoes.

A street in Ust-Nera

Interestingly, the frozen earth means that all houses are on pillars; houses are all Brejnev-time apartment buildings here, as most of the town was created at a time when the Soviets did not build anything else.

Typical housing building in Ust-Nera

No matter how remote, the propaganda has always made its way to you. OK, your local Lenin statue might be of a cheaper material, but there is one – and you did receive Putin’s posters for the latest anniversary of the Great Patriotic War.

Stained Lenin statue in Artyk

The next town is an 8-hour drive and it’s the exact same town. For a change of scenery, you should take a 2-hour flight in an old Antonov or Tupolev aircraft.

Your apartment is the same as everyone’s apartment in Russia, as illustrated so well in Russia’s cult film The Irony of Fate. You may have the model with 1 or 2 bedroom, it’s not too bad actually, you can hear the neighbours but you have central heating, and it costs 45.000 rubles per square metre (730 euro), 3 times less than in Moscow.

Someone is trying to sell an apartment in Ust-Nera, but it doesn’t look like many people are interested.

There are 3 or 4 shops in town and they all sell the same basic stuff. Everything is brought by truck from Yakutsk where it is brought by flight from Moscow, so it’s not fresh and costs 3 times more.

Your supplies depend on the town’s supplies. I have heard people in the shops not ask “What have you got today?” but “What has arrived today?”.

Ust-Nera’s municipal park

In continental Russia, kids often play in parks on real tanks from the war. No tank actually made it all the way here, but Moscow has thought of everything and provided the local kids this wonder of a toy to play with in the municipal park.

Entertainment is scarce, but serious. The town has one restaurant and one cafe, and there is still some activity every now and then at the House of Metallurgists.

Ust Nera’s House of Metallurgists

There is probably a reason why you’re here. There is a mine nearby and you’re a skilled worker and got incentivised to move here a long time ago. Or your family’s history is that of former gulag convicts who never returned to mainland Russia. And now you’re stuck here. It would be too expensive to move elsewhere – and to go where anyway?

Ust-Nera is pretty remote, but has a really nice WWII memorial

Russians tend to be fatalist. In the small town of Artyk, I asked an old lady who has been living there all her life, how she liked it. Instead of answering the question, she shrugged and said “Artyk is just a transport hub you know, there’s not much going on”. Make up your mind what she actually meant.

In the permafrost regions, all pipes are kept above the ground. This has a huge impact on the street layout.
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7 thoughts on “What it’s like to live in the most isolated town of remote Russia

  1. Interesting article 🙂 i’ve been in St Petersburg and Moscow and a lot of ex soviet countries and would love to spend more time in Russia, it’s such a huge and diverse country! Thanks for sharing 🙂 PedroL

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  2. I would really like to spend a winter in a town like this. Once.
    When you can’t go outside for long and there are no attractions or distractions (I wonder whom I would find on Tinder there), it should be a very productive winter for studying or writing.

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  3. The apartment blocks are not only all the same in Russia, but also in other post-Soviet states. I lived in such an apartment in Vilnius for a year – https://andreasmoser.blog/2013/03/03/savanoriu-prospektas-winter-evening/ – and whenever I visited friends, I knew exactly where the bathroom and where the kitchen was. Because the layout was standard. Once I had a Courchsurfing guest from Armenia and he said “oh, your apartment looks exactly the same as mine”.

    Liked by 1 person

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